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New Advanced Neurofunctional Sports Performance Specialist Curriculum:
Important Message from Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco

Testimonials

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Acupuncture starts and ends with A C U R E

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on April 17, 2013

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An old English fable concluded with this powerful moral: “In this world, the most important person is the person in front of you who needs your help, the most important thing is to help them, and the most important time is right now.”
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Neurofunctional Acupuncture, The success of an integrated model

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on April 1, 2011

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Canadian Chiropractor Magazine – April 2011
McMaster Contemporary Medical Acupuncture Program

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Acupuncture for pain? No thanks

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on March 1, 2011

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Is acupuncture a reasonably effective intervention for the treatment of pain? Advocates will tell you “Yes” and show you dozens of studies to support their enthusiastic claim. Detractors will tell you “No” and quickly add that based on randomized control trials and recent meta-analyses acupuncture is no better than placebo to treat pain. [click to continue…]

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The Vital Role of Neurofunctional Acupuncture

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on October 1, 2010

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An Education in Acupuncture

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on November 1, 2009

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By Chris O’Connor RMT, DO-MTP, Prov CMA

As an RMT I am always on the lookout for training programmes that will not only help to fulfill my CEU quota, but will also afford the opportunity to learn something valuable that will encourage me to become a better practitioner. I was introduced to Contemporary Medical Acupuncture by a class mate of mine during Osteopathic training. At the time I had limited knowledge of the practice of acupuncture, how it worked and its potential benefits. I decided to do some research about the differences between the various schools of thought regarding acupuncture.
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Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco MD (Spain), Director McMaster University Contemporary Medical Acupuncture Program
Chris O´Connor, RMT, Instructor McMaster CMA Program

Introduction
In recent years, the McMaster Contemporary Medical Acupuncture for Health Professionals (CMA) Program has become an increasingly popular choice for RMTs in Ontario seeking acupuncture training. In July, 2000 the College of Massage Therapists of Ontario (CMTO) granted its members the right to perform acupuncture during massage treatments. Because acupuncture can be expected to benefit the soft tissues and joints of the body, it is accordingly considered an effective manipulation that falls within the guidelines of the Massage Therapy Act.
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Acupuncture in the integrated treatment of Temporomandibular (TMD) disorders

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on February 1, 2009

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by Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco, M.D. (Spain), Director McMaster Contemporary Medical Acupuncture Program, Hamilton, Ontario
and Rodrigo Garcia-Loyer, Odontologist, Director Cranio-Cervico-Mandibular Disorders Institute, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Hospital News – February 2009

Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) are a group of conditions that cause pain and dysfunction in the jaw joint and its associated muscles. Some estimates suggest that over 10 million US citizens are affected. In a 2001 article, the Journal of the Canadian Dental Association revealed that the prevalence of TMD related symptoms in the Canadian population ranged from 5% to 15%, with peak prevalence between 20-40 years of age. The condition appears to be more common in women than in men.
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Contemporary Acupuncture Enhances Contemporary Chiropractic

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on September 1, 2007

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by David Salanki, DC, Anthony Lombardi, DC, Michael Prebeg, DC, Lecturers and Clinical instructors, McMaster Contemporary Acupuncture Program

How many chiropractors could predict with certainty what our practice environment would look like 10 to 15 years into the future? Imagine for a moment traveling back in time, perhaps one hundred years or so, and envisioning the current mosaic of chiropractic techniques and procedures that we currently have available to us today. It would have been more than daunting, in fact, it would have been an impossible task for our forefathers to envision the current scope and direction of chiropractic practice. As practicing chiropractors, it is equally difficult for us to know what lies ahead as the chiropractic paradigm unfolds into the future. When we enrolled in our respective chiropractic colleges, as first year students, it never crossed our minds that acupuncture would be a part of our day- to-day chiropractic practices. Even more surprising would be the thought that we would someday, be sharing our coupled clinical chiropractic and acupuncture experience as lecturers and clinical instructors in the postgraduate division of one of Canada’s leading institutions responsible for educating medical doctors, dentists, chiropractors, physiotherapists and other regulated health professionals in Contemporary Acupuncture. The two themes that have taken our careers into this direction are the themes of this issue; the current research and the evidence based practice of acupuncture and continuing education.
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Contemporary Acupuncture and Sports Medicine: an overview

by Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco on March 1, 2007

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Dr. Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco, MD (Spain) Director McMaster University Contemporary Medical Acupuncture Program
Chris O´Connor, RMT, Instructor McMaster CMA Program

Introduction
In Sports Medicine, we are still far from understanding the amazingly complex and delicate neurological connections that make highly precise movements possible. In clinical practice, we need to oversimplify these millions of coordinated electrical impulses into a small number of measurable outputs in order to be able to approach the study of the dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal system of the athlete.
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by Alejandro Elorriaga Claraco, MD (Spain), Director McMaster Contemporary Acupuncture Program and Angelica Fargas-Babjak, MD, Chair McMaster Contemporary Acupuncture Program

Whether acute or chronic, each pain problem is a personal experience with a unique combination of dysfunctions, sensory signals, and complex emotions. The main difference between acute and chronic pain is that in the latter tissue injury can no longer be used as the guiding model to explain symptoms. Instead, a neurobiological model that takes into account contributions by the peripheral and central nervous systems needs to be used. Processes such as peripheral and central sensitization are now key players in the maintenance of the sensory components of the pain problem. In addition, central processes related to the cognitive and affective dimensions of pain are also fundamental contributors to the experience.
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